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Ecological Engineering is a scientific journal widely looking up environmental protection problems. All articles published in the journal are peer-reviewed.
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INFLUENCE OF BIOLOGICAL AND THERMAL TRANSFORMED SEWAGE SLUDGE APPLICATION ON MANGANESE CONTENT IN PLANTS AND SOIL

Jerzy Korol 2  
 
1
Katedra Chemii Rolnej i Środowiskowej, Uniwersytet Rolniczy im. H. Kołłątaja w Krakowie, Al. A. Mickiewicza 21, 31-120 Kraków
2
Zakład Inżynierii Materiałowej, Główny Instytut Górnictwa, Plac Gwarków 1, 40-166 Katowice
Inż. Ekolog. 2014; 37:17–30
Publish date: 2014-10-17
DOI: 10.12912/2081139X.14
KEYWORDS:
ABSTRACT:
A great variety of sewage sludge treatment methods, due to the agent (chemical, biological, thermal) leads to the formation of varying ‘products’ properties, including the content of heavy metals forms. The aim of the study was to determine the effects of biologically and thermally transformed sewage sludge on the manganese content in plants and form of this element in the soil. The study was based on a two-year pot experiment. In this study was used stabilized sewage sludge collected from Wastewater Treatment Plant Krakow – ”Płaszów” and its mixtures with wheat straw in the gravimetric ratio 1:1 in conversion to material dry matter, transformed biologically (composting by 117 days in a bioreactor) and thermally (in the furnace chamber with no air access by the following procedure exposed to temperatures of 130 °C for 40 min → 200 °C for 30 min). In both years of the study biologically and thermally transformed mixtures of sewage sludge with wheat straw demonstrated similar impact on the amount of biomass plants to the pig manure. Bigger amounts of manganese were assessed in oat biomass than in spring rape biomass. The applied sewage sludge and its biologically and thermally converted mixtures did not significantly affect manganese content in plant biomass in comparison with the farmyard manure. The applied fertilization did not modify the values of translocation and bioaccumulation ratios of manganese in the above-ground parts and roots of spring rape and oat. No increase in the content of the available to plants forms of manganese in the soil after applying biologically and thermally transformed sewage sludge mixtures with straw was detected. In the second year, lower contents of these manganese forms were noted in the soil of all objects compared with the first year of the experiment.